Developments

World Day For Laboratory (Animals)


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The World Day for Laboratory Animals Countdown Clock will show you the number of days, hours, minutes & seconds until World Day for Laboratory Animals 2019.

World Day for Laboratory Animals, also known as World Day for Animals in Laboratories or World Lab Animal Day, is an annual global observance held on April 24. It was established in 1979 by the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) based in the United Kingdom.
The date April 24 was chosen because it marked the birthday of Hugh Dowding, British Air Chief Marshal who was an avid anti-vivisectionist. After the Second World War, he served as president of NAVS, and his wife Muriel was a NAVS Council member.

According to statistics provided by NAVS, every year approximately 100 million animals suffer and die in laboratories, although there are advanced alternatives that can replace tests on animals. World Lab Animal Day focuses on raising awareness about cruel animal tests and their advanced non-animal alternatives that are more effective and reliable and do not result in the death of living creatures.

World Day for Laboratory Animals is marked by protests, demonstrations, rallies, conferences, media events against the use of animals in research. The surrounding week is referred to as World Week for Animals in Laboratories, Lab Animal Week or World Laboratory Animal Liberation Week.

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World Day For Animals In Laboratories (WDAIL) (also known as World Lab Animal Day) is observed every year on 24 April. The surrounding week has come to be known as “World Week for Animals In Laboratories”. The National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) describe the day as an “international day of commemoration” for animals in laboratories.

World Day For Animals In Laboratories was established in 1980 by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals(PETA). PETA Founder, Ingrid Newkirk created the day to advocate for animals in labs.

Today the event is marked by demonstrations and protests by groups opposed to the use of animals in research. In April 2010 protesters marched through central London calling for an end to the use of animals in research,. A similar march took place in Birmingham in 2012. and Nottingham in 2014.

World Day and World Week For Animals In Laboratories have also attracted attention from scientific groups defending the use of animals in research. On 22 April 2009 members of UCLA Pro-Test held a rally in support of biomedical research on animals, and to condemn the violence and harassment directed at faculty member Prof. David Jentsch by animal activists.

NAVS and other groups opposed to animal research have claimed that World Day For Animals In Laboratories is recognised by the United Nations. However, the day is not included on the official list of United Nations observances.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is an American animal rights organization based in Norfolk, Virginia, and led by Ingrid Newkirk, its international president. A nonprofit corporation with nearly 400 employees, it claims that it has 6.5 million members and supporters, in addition to claiming that it is the “largest animal rights group in the world.” Its slogan is “Animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way.”

Founded in March 1980 by Ingrid Newkirk and fellow animal rights activist Alex Pacheco, the organization first caught the public’s attention in the summer of 1981 during what became known as the Silver Spring monkeys case, a widely publicized dispute about experiments conducted on 17 macaque monkeys inside the Institute of Behavioral Research in Silver Spring, Maryland. The case lasted 10 years, involved the only police raid on an animal laboratory in the United States, triggered an amendment in 1985 to that country’s Animal Welfare Act, and established PETA as an internationally known organization. Today, it focuses on four core issues—opposition to factory farming, fur farming, animal testing, and the use of animals in entertainment. It also campaigns for a vegan lifestyle and against eating meat, fishing, the killing of animals regarded as pests, the keeping of chained backyard dogs, cock fighting, dog fighting, and bullfighting.

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The group is the focus of controversy, both inside and outside the animal rights movement and around the world. Newkirk, and formerly Pacheco, are seen as the leading exporters of animal rights to the more traditional animal-protection groups in the United States, but sections of the movement nonetheless say that PETA is not radical enough—law professor Gary Francione lists the group among what he calls “the new welfarists,” arguing that its work with industries to achieve reform, which continues in the tradition of Henry Spira, makes it an animal welfare group, not an animal rights group. Newkirk told Salon in 2001 that PETA works toward the ideal but tries in the meantime to provide carrot-and-stick incentives. There has also been criticism from feminists within the movement about the use of scantily clad women in PETA’s anti-fur campaigns and others, but as Norm Phelps notes, “Newkirk has been consistent in her response. No one, she says, is being exploited.

Everyone is an uncoerced volunteer. Sexual attraction is a fact of life, and if it can advance the animals’ cause, she makes no apologies for using it.” Also, Phelps notes that some activists believe that the group’s media stunts trivialize animal rights, but he qualifies this by saying, “It’s hard to argue with success and PETA is far and away the most successful cutting-edge animal rights organization in the world.” Newkirk’s view is that PETA has a duty to be “press sluts.” She argues, “It is our obligation. We would be worthless if we were just polite and didn’t make any waves.”