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Onion Rings Day


Onion Rings Day 22-jun-2020

National Onion Ring Day is the holiday for you! On June 22, the nation celebrates the irresistible deliciousness of onion rings—often by eating as many of them as possible. It’s unclear when onion rings were first developed, but an onion ring-like recipe appeared in an 1802 cookbook, and another surfaced in a New York newspaper in 1910. Texas-based restaurant chain Kirbys Pig Stand claims it played a big part in onion rings’ creation, and fast food restaurant A&W helped them reach widespread popularity. There is still an ongoing debate over who deserves credit for the snack’s creation, and cooks also still argue about how to best prepare and serve onion rings for the most flavorful results. Some onion rings are even made from an onion paste, as opposed to an onion ring itself! This style of preparation can make it easier to eat the rings without accidentally yanking the onion out of the fried batter.

National Onion Rings Day is observed on June 22nd of every year. National Onion Rings Day celebrate the rich and crisp Onion rings. They are delicious, surprisingly sweet for the flavour, so it is related to being spicy and the source of tears. Deep frying them in the vat of oil brings out the real delicious flavours which are hidden inside. It is the favourite one for the burger joints all over the world.

As total lovers of all things onion-yummy, we set aside time of reverence on June 22 to fully appreciate the 24-hour period as National Onion Ring Day.

And, as is fitting for our fave vegetable, there are actually TWO onion holidays in late June, with National Onion Day celebrated on press day, June 27. So happy days, fellow onion lovers!

There’s a good bit of history surrounding National Onion Rings Day, which is celebrated not just on U.S. soil but also in Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and some parts of Asia. We’re told the exact origin of this most delectable of treats is unknown, but there is a recipe called “Fried Onions with Parmesan Cheese” that is in John Mollard’s 1802 cookbook “The Art of Cookery Made Easy and Refined.” Obviously a man ahead of his times, John suggests “cutting onions into 1/2 inch rings, dipping them into a batter made of flour, cream, salt, pepper and Parmesan cheese then deep frying them in boiling lard.” Heck yeah. Of course lard might be replaced with something a bit less artery-clogging, like maybe EVOO. But John, in his infinite wisdom, goes on to recommend serving the rings “with a sauce made of melted butter and mustard.”

There are others who believe that a recipe for “French Fried Onions,” one not claiming to have originated the dish, “appeared in the Middletown, NY Daily Times on Jan. 13, 1910.” And there’s the Pig Stand restaurant chain, founded in Oak Cliff, TX, in the early 1920s, which is among those who claim to have invented onion rings. Any eatery that calls itself the Pig Stand is legit in our book.

They’re rich and crisp and delicious, surprisingly sweet for a flavor so often related to being spicy and the source of tears. But something about the process of breading them in a flavorful coating and deep-frying them in a vat of oil brings out the delicious flavors hidden inside. They come in towers and flowers, giant-sized and tiny, and they’re a favorite at burger joints all over the world. That’s right, we’re talking about the onion rings, and Onion Rings Day celebrates this delicious treat and its long history.

As if that wasn’t complicated enough, there’s even a variety of onion rings that are made from an onion paste formed into a circle instead of an actual slice of onion. If you’ve ever enjoyed these delicious treats, then Onion Rings Day provides you with an excuse to go to your favorite source and consume onion rings until you burst.

Onion rings aren’t just an invention of the western world. There’s also evidence that people experimented with the idea of covering strips of onion with batter and deep-frying them in developing countries too. In India, for instance, merchants would often sell fried, battered onion strips as street food – a quick snack that people could munch on the go.

As we discussed, historians have found examples of onion ring-like recipes that date back as far as 1802. With that said, there are restaurants in operation today that claim to be the originators of the idea.

Kirby’s Pig Stand – the famous historical restaurant chain – claims to have battered and served up the first official onion rings as far back as the 1920s. The restaurant’s location in Dallas, TX, was the first in the world to offer a drive-in service where people could collect food from the convenience of their vehicles.

Some people really don’t like onions. Many won’t go near them, even if they’re covered in batter and deep-fried, but that’s okay. You don’t have to eat onion rings, though, to celebrate Onion Rings Day – you can branch out. Remember, onion rings were the inspiration for many of the fried snacks and sides that we enjoy today. French fries, deep-fried brie, and fried chicken are all delicious alternatives that you can try if you fancy something different.

There are so many reasons to celebrate Onion Rings Day. Onion rings are one of the most popular snacks and have become a staple in many parts of the world. They’re a bit like French fries, but taste even more special and delicious in some cases. You can dip them, dunk them, and eat them alongside all your favorite sandwiches and hamburgers. You can even lay them out at a buffet at parties. They’re so flexible!

There is still an ongoing debate over who deserves credit for the snack’s creation, and cooks also still argue about how to best prepare and serve onion rings for the most flavorful results. Some onion rings are even made from an onion paste, as opposed to an onion ring itself!